Detroit nixes Tiger Stadium viewing party because that’s what Detroit does

It was a good idea, anyway: Fans of Detroit’s not-quite-all-gone Tiger Stadium organized a viewing party Saturday night where locals could watch Game 3 of the World Series on a 20-foot TV screen, have DJed music between innings, etc. It didn’t happen, though, because city officials decided the event didn’t have the proper permits, including “City Council approval.”

The group Historic Detroit responded with an appropriately pissy Facebook post:

Everyone thought it was a great idea, that is, except for the City of Detroit, which officially pulled the plug on the party this morning, threatening to arrest anyone on the field for trespassing.

That’s right, folks. The same city government that brought you a giant empty field instead of a preserved National Historic Landmark and field for youth baseball has said no one is allowed on the field. Any of the tens of thousands of OTHER vacant, city-owned lots, you’re welcome to prance about on. But not the site of Tiger Stadium. You’ll be arrested for that.

Of course, given the way the Series turned out, Tigers fans are probably glad that they weren’t subjected to this.

If nothing else, the Tigers’ brief appearance in the World Series provided the opportunity for some national media coverage of the history of Tiger Stadium and attempts to preserve the site for baseball (check out Reggie Jackson’s awesome hat in this one). The current city plan is to try to develop the site as anything other than a ballfield as soon as possible, but given that this is Detroit, “as soon as possible” can always mean “never.” In the meantime, volunteers continue to maintain the field and play the occasion pickup game there — check out their Facebook page if you want to get involved.


6 comments on “Detroit nixes Tiger Stadium viewing party because that’s what Detroit does

  1. Hope everyone on the east coast is doing ok (except the Donald, of course…).

    Just a thought re: Tigers stadium, but is it possible that city council “can’t” allow people to use the facility for anything baseball related because they ‘agreed’ not to allow it to in any way compete with Comerica as part of that deal?

    I know it sounds ridiculous, but I’m aware of a couple of hockey arena deals where the person who would be in control of the “new” building (yes, it goes without saying, despite not paying for it) demanded that the old one be destroyed or otherwise made unable to compete for any events with “his” new building.

    Certainly I would never try to defend the type of idiot that tends to run for municipal government office, but is there any chance something like this happened w Briggs/Navin/Tiger stadium?

  2. Since Kung Fu Panda gets to name a “Field Of Dreams” location paid for by GM (as part of his MVP of series award), wouldn’t it be awesome if he picked the old Tiger stadium site?

  3. Fantastic idea MJ!!!!

    But hopefully he’ll pick a run down inner city neighbourhood that actually needs a community diamond.

  4. Were the “organizers” going to provide sufficient power/lighting, sanitation, security, liability coverage and emergency medical services for this? What about dirty details like provisions for cars or police coverage?
    Any city will scrutinize a situation like this for potential trouble spots, that’s why permits are needed so that what was mentioned above is covered. Any mention of when this was brought to the city’s attention?
    Usually takes some time for all of the issues to be covered – especially for something happening at night.
    Otherwise it’s a trouble spot waiting to happen.
    A part of of a spot from out of town local coverage isn’t national, even on the ‘net.
    The videos show activity during the day, whereas this would take place over several hours in the dark with temperatures in the 40’s – sounds like fun.
    I know that this won’t be popular with those that have emotional ties to the place, but they should not have been surprised with the result – I’m not.

  5. Paul W, in regards to
    “Were the “organizers” going to provide sufficient power/lighting, sanitation, security, liability coverage and emergency medical services for this? What about dirty details like provisions for cars or police coverage?
    Any city will scrutinize a situation like this for potential trouble spots, that’s why permits are needed so that what was mentioned above is covered. Any mention of when this was brought to the city’s attention?”

    Oh baloney! The city does not incur one extra dime of cost for police or emergency medical service when people are playing baseball on a grassy field. The same people, who already pay taxes and receive some police and emergency services regardless of where they are at in Detroit, would be out on this field. Detroit could easily turn the 9 acres over to a non-profit and incur absolutely no costs.

  6. Since the games are scheduled for 8pm starts, it’s a guarantee that a “viewing party” would be conducted in the dark.
    An after dark viewing party of 2 or more attendees would
    have to be serviced with what I mentioned previously as opposed to a half dozen that might show up during the day.
    Towns and cities have procedures to try to ensure that
    public gatherings have peaceful/safe results that require police and safety personnel. If city services have to be assigned to specifically protect a section of town normally vacant they will either have to pull cops from another area (leaving it shortchanged) or incur extra expense of overtime
    for extra personnel.
    Has anybody bothered to find out when this was proposed
    to the city?
    If something happens to attendees or their property at
    night the lawsuits would come fast and furious. Cities deny permits for potentially risky public gatherings because of
    the chance of problems arising – especially at night in
    a place like Detroit.
    The city administration does not have the personal
    connection to the stadium that those who want to keep the field and would rather have a tax producing entity
    there that would produce jobs of some sort.
    Is this bad thing?
    Sports fans tend to throw around words like “easily” when
    it comes to matters that they want but they only see what
    they want and rarely look beyond their personal Interest.
    Again, those who have an emotional investment in this
    won’t agree but until they can change the city administration circumstances won’t change.

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