U-T San Diego transcribes Chargers marketing speech, calls this “reporting”

Good morning, San Diego! Let’s see what’s in today’s local newspaper, shall we?

The San Diego Chargers are an economic driver to this region, but some potential for the offseason is left on the sidelines because Qualcomm Stadium can’t attract big-time events

Oh, no! This is indeed a crisis! Who’s reporting these findings, anyway?

said Ken Derrett, the team’s chief marketing officer Tuesday.

Oh. Well, that’s not exactly an unbiased source, but surely the reporter has called an independent economist to see whather they think Derrett’s claims are legit. Right? (Reads. Reads some more. End of article.) Oh.

I’d normally make some kind of sarcastic remark here about the shabby state of journalism, but given that the newspaper in question, U-T San Diego, is run by people who want it to be a “cheerleader” for a new stadium and call out those who don’t as “obstructionists,” it’s tough to argue that there’a any journalism involved here at all. So instead, kudos to U-T San Diego content manufacturer of the month Jonathan Horn for living up to his employer’s corporate business model! They give out Pulitzers for that, right?


5 comments on “U-T San Diego transcribes Chargers marketing speech, calls this “reporting”

  1. Well, it’s nice to see the U-T’s takeover by one of the more vile corporate parasites on the face of the earth has ushered in a new era of media prostitution.

    Seriously, what’s the point of having a system of taxation if you can’t use it to transfer wealth from the poor to the staggeringly wealthy?

  2. Papa Doug Manchester is a corrupt scumbag, a bigot, and the world will be a better place when he is gone.

    The taxpayers aren’t budging on a new stadium, the powers that be can pound sand.

  3. Liberalism hasn’t meant anything to me since they gave it to Henry Kissinger.

  4. This statement by a team flack is just more of the same entitled whining that is the Chargers (& their boosters) stock in trade. The City’s financial troubles, awful as they are, have had one positive effect: they make a public stadium subsidy less likely. Dougie and his shills can bloviate all they want, but the City just doesn’t have the ability to borrow like it used to–and that’s ultimately a good thing.

    I recall when the Padres took the City to the cleaners for their stadium, I thought (& this, I freely confess, was not only me, but lots of people), “Great. Now the Chargers will decide they just can’t survive without a new stadium, too.” Sure enough, the NFL said that no more Superbowls could be held in San Diego unless we built a new stadium. I remember thinking at the time, “Well, guys, the Chargers ain’t gonna be in many Superbowls, new stadium or not!”

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