NY Times version of Braves stadium story: County considered public vote, it didn’t happen, the end

How to soft-pedal affronts to democracy, New York Times edition:

Tim Lee, the Cobb County chairman who steered negotiations with the [Atlanta] Braves, said Tuesday a vote had been considered for the 700,000 residents of a county historically cautious about government spending. Ultimately, there was no referendum, just an agreement that the county chip in about 45 percent of the actual construction cost, with the Braves picking up the rest.

Not mentioned in this story of a county considering a referendum but “ultimately” having one quashed by the passive voice: The Cobb commissioner who said that a referendum on a $300 million stadium subsidy would be too expensive because it would “cost taxpayers 300, 400 thousand dollars.” Not to mention the part where any public agitation for a referendum was avoided by having county commissioners hide in hallways so that the deal could be announced just two weeks before the commission’s vote. The Times really should have gone with one of the alternate slogans.


2 comments on “NY Times version of Braves stadium story: County considered public vote, it didn’t happen, the end

  1. Nice they calculated the most expensive way to hold a referendum on the subject for an excuse, having it’s own independent vote to meet the a timeline not to hold up the proceedings, when it could have been done for practically nothing by waiting till the next scheduled election and adding that as an item to the ballot.

  2. In other Atlanta sports facilities news, the mayor has taken the lead in the sales negotiations for the Hawks, pledging to do whatever it takes to keep the team in the city. Philips Arena, which is even younger than the soon to be demolished Georgia Dome and Turner Field, might get $150 million of public money for upgrades as a sweetener for whoever buys the Hawks.