D.C. United to critics of stadium design: How about a fountain? You like fountains, right?

Still on the road, but can’t fail to alert you to new stadium renderings from D.C. United that were released yesterday (on Twitter, because 2016). The last round of renderings, you’ll recall, was disparaged as looking like a prison:

dc-united-press dcunited.imrs.phpSo how do the new pictures compare?

https://twitter.com/dcunited/status/767881787670466560

That’s, um, pretty similar. There’s a big glass box sticking out of one corner for some reason, instead of the big grey box, and some kind of fountain with giant lens-flare-bedecked “D.C. UNITED” letters in the middle of it right in the path of fans trying to get to the game, but otherwise the design is largely unchanged. It’s not a bad design, but it’s a bit no-frills compared to the original one floated when United was trying to get citizens of D.C. to pay for it:

At least United is still planning on having lots of featureless ghost fans come to games. Make your own MLS attendance jokes.


6 comments on “D.C. United to critics of stadium design: How about a fountain? You like fountains, right?

  1. Interesting stuff and all, but what the heck is Pablo Maurer talking about. I can’t remember a single case of a publicly subsidized stadium’s design changing so radically after approval. Maybe Maurer is just referring to minor league sports, like MLS.

  2. Very nice open space, next to a stadium in an area that is already short on parking and not a short walk from Metro. Traffic to Nats games has been worse than ever, I’d rather see a garage than fountain.

  3. Hmmmmm…..Ghost fans???

    Something says DC United may be borrowing those from the Carolina Hurricanes or Jacksonville Jaguars [ via those fiends, I mean friends at ABC and CBS].

  4. Not that I care, but with the overhang being significantly reduced, fans in the end zones and lower bowls are going to BAKE in the DC summer sun.

  5. I think lots of stadiums change a lot from conception. Nats Park in DC is one of them–not least for all the wonderful development that would be surrounding it. The design went from hopeful to painfully dull by the time it was built.

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