Chargers stadium measure is going to lose, question is only by how much

To win $1.15 billion in public money for a new stadium and convention center expansion, San Diego Chargers owner Dean Spanos needs to have more than two-thirds of ballots cast on election day be in favor of his funding measure — unless he somehow gets an appeals court to not just overturn this summer’s ruling that it will take a supermajority to approve the measure, but make it retroactive that a simple majority will do. Not that it matters, because it doesn’t look likely that the measure is even going to get 50%, let alone 67%:

The survey shows 41 percent of likely voters say they are certain to vote against Measure C and 36 percent say they are certain to vote for it. The remaining 23 percent describe themselves as “not certain.”…

“If there’s some blockbuster development that could alter the course of history, maybe the support group rallies,” said [SurveyUSA president Jay] Leve, whose company conducted the poll. “But even if it does rally, it would be unprecedented and historic in the annals of polling for something that’s trailing 30 days before the election to come back and get a super majority of 67 percent.”

And to add insult to injury, a sizable portion of voters say they’d be considering voting for the measure if the team didn’t suck:

More than half of likely voters said the team’s performance had no effect on their support for Measure C, but 34 percent said it made them less likely to support the measure and only 10 percent said it made them more likely to support it.

There’s still a few weeks to go, but it’s safe to say that we can not only call this vote, but the aftermath: The stadium measure is going to fall far short of a two-thirds majority, Spanos and Mayor Kevin Faulconer will scramble to come up with a way to say that the people who did vote for it represent a mandate to develop a new deal that doesn’t require two-thirds voter approval, and then everyone will stare at their feet a whole lot as they realize that nobody knows how to make $1.15 billion appear out of thin air without raising taxes in some way (and thus requiring a public vote), which is why they were in this mess to begin with.

It’s tough to see any end game at this point that doesn’t involve the Chargers moving to Inglewood, unless maybe Spanos decides he’d rather be top dog in San Diego than second fiddle in L.A. and decides to put more of his own money into a new (or renovated?) stadium, or just decides to stick around and wait things out until maybe his team starts winning games and voters decide this is a reason to throw more money at him. I wouldn’t bet big money on it, but stranger things have happened.


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