Friday roundup: How Kansas City evicted a team for rent non-payment and ended up costing itself $1m, and other stories

This week’s recommended reading: Girl to City, Amy Rigby’s just-published memoir of the two decades that took her from newly arrived art student in 1970s New York to divorced single mom and creator of the acclaimed debut album Diary of a Mod Housewife. (Disclosure, I guess: I edited an early version of one chapter for the Village Voice last year.) I picked up my copy last week at the launch of Rigby’s fall book tour, and whether you love her music or her long-running blog (guilty as charged on both counts) or enjoy tales of CBGB-era proto-gentrifying New York or coming-of-age-stories about women balancing self-doubt and determination or just a perfectly turned punchline, I highly recommend it: Like her best songs, it made me laugh and cry and think, often at the same time, and that’s all I can ask for in great art.

But first, read this news roundup post, because man, is there a lot of news to be rounded up:

Friday roundup: More on MLB attendance decline, plus stadium rumors and the reports of rumors

In case you missed it, I revisited the question of MLB’s attendance decline for Deadspin this week, by way of picking apart a New York Times article on the topic that got a couple of things right and a whole bunch of things less right. The upshot is that team owners don’t really need lots of fans to show up, but they sure would like them to, but only if they can accomplish this without cannibalizing the luxury seat sales that are their bread and butter these days — all of which makes all the “Whither baseball?” handwringing even less justifiable. Lesson: Don’t try to measure the demand curve just by looking at product sales. (Okay, maybe that’s only the lesson I take from it, but it’s one lesson.)

Meanwhile, news!

Anaheim completes appraisal of Angels stadium land value, won’t let public see it

Good news: The city of Anaheim has finally received its completed appraisal of the value of stadium parking lot land that Los Angeles Angels owner Arte Moreno wants development rights to as part of a new lease deal, after weeks of saying it only had a “draft” version that couldn’t be released to the public. Significantly less good news: The Anaheim city council still won’t release the appraisal to the public, because reasons.

The City Council directed the city staff to make the appraisal “available to both the public and Council,” according to the meeting minutes. On Tuesday, the City Council received the results of the appraisal — then declined to share those results with the public.

After a handful of speakers urged the council to be transparent in its negotiations with the Angels, Councilman Jose Moreno proposed a public presentation of the appraisal next month. He needed three votes out of seven. He got two votes, one of them his own…

None of the council members who opposed Jose Moreno’s proposal explained why — including Stephen Faessel, who voted last November in favor of releasing the appraisal publicly.

This is disturbing, if not exactly shocking: The state of New York, after all, only released its appraisals of public land being provided for an Islanders arena three and a half hours before the final public vote on the plan (and still has only released the executive summaries, not the complete appraisals). And as the Los Angeles Times notes, Anaheim itself kept its appraisal of Ducks arena land under wraps until five days before voting on that team’s new lease deal.

The advantage for public officials of not wanting to release land value figures is obvious: You can negotiate anything you like without anyone in the press or the public trying to kibitz whether you’re getting a fair price or not. This is also why the public might want to consider screaming bloody murder when officials pull this sort of move, since democracy still involves public oversight of elected officials’ actions, at least last I checked.

All of which could still be fine, so long as the Anaheim city council uses its powers to negotiate in secret to strike a deal that gets the best value for the public, while sitting in a room with only Angels execs and no danger of anyone else knowing what they’re talking about until it’s too late to do anything. That’s not impossible — Anaheim didn’t do a terrible job with the Ducks deal under similar circumstances, after all — but still, it would be nice to have more than five days to make sure everything is on the up and up. Let’s just hope the don’t choose to release it, say, the day before Thanksgiving, with the vote the following Monday. (Oh, crap, I probably shouldn’t give them any ideas, should I?)

Angels sell $101m a year in tickets, but only pay $178,000 in rent to Anaheim

Now here’s a fun headline you don’t see too often, though it could run pretty much anywhere anytime:

Angels Make $100 Million a Year at Stadium While Anaheim Barely Gets a Slice

The news here is that Voice of O.C. reporter Spencer Custodio got ahold of Anaheim’s receipts from Los Angeles Angles ticket sales revenue sharing, and it turns out it’s next to nothing: Because the Angels’ lease says the team only has to share $2 a ticket with the city once it’s sold more than 2.6 million tickets, Anaheim ended up bringing in only $11.5 million total between 2010 and 2018, while sending $9.9 million back to the Angels for maintenance costs, for a net rent of $1.6 million over nine years. At the same time, according to Forbes’ numbers, the team brings in $101 million a year from ticket sales alone.

I’m heavily quoted in the article, along with sports economists Allen Sanderson and Roger Noll, but I think some of my points may have gotten garbled a bit — I’m quoted accurately, but some of the context got lost in translation. So let me elaborate here, where I can go on and on and no one can interrupt me for word count:

  • This is, of course, a terrible lease. Anaheim paid $24 million to build Anaheim Stadium in 1966, and paid $100 million to renovate it again in 1996 as part of the deal that set up the current lease. Yet the city receives only a pittance in rent — and nothing from concessions, advertising, or naming rights — that won’t even come close to paying off the last renovation. (“You got to be more hard nosed, hard assed or something in terms of negotiations and got to be willing to let the team walk, or you’re going to lose money on this,” says Sanderson in the article.)
  • It’s terrible largely because of that 2.6 million ticket threshold, which 1) is an extremely high level to reach (only ten teams in MLB sold that many tickets last year, and most didn’t clear it by much), and 2) gives the team a huge incentive to raise ticket prices rather than keeping them low enough to draw more fans, since if they sell fewer tickets for more money, they don’t have to share any of it with Anaheim. Especially since selling fewer tickets for more money seems to be MLB’s marketing strategy these days.
  • A better revenue-sharing plan would have set the threshold lower, or had no threshold at all. As Noll says: “Historically, before the stadium subsidy craze took hold, the standard agreement between a local government and team is they would pay rent in a fraction of gate revenue, which was usually six percent. It would be huge now because [the Angels] take [in] over $100 million now.”
  • Even that could be problematic, though, given current trends in ticket marketing. For example, let’s say Angels owner Arte Moreno had to share six cents on every dollar in ticket revenue with Anaheim, as Noll suggests. Moreno’s first task, I’m sure, would be to figure out how to reclassify as much income as possible as not from “ticket sales.” One possibility off the top of my head: Instead of selling season tickets for $5,000 a season, charge a $4,000 “membership fee” to the “Angels Premier Fan Club,” which would allow you to buy season tickets for just $1,000 a year. That’ll be $60 to you, Anaheim — what, no, you can’t have any share of the other $4,000, that’s not ticket sales, that’s a membership fee!
  • Accordingly, the fairest system (and the hardest to game) is just straight cash rent. As I told Custodio, that way “you’re not penalizing the city if the team is terrible and you’re not disincentivizing the team to sell tickets.”

Either way, the upshot is: The Angels have a sweetheart deal on their lease, and Anaheim really should drive a harder bargain in their next one. This isn’t made any easier by the fact that the city just gave Moreno a nine-year lease extension without apparently realizing they were doing it; still, given that Moreno is drooling at the prospect of getting development rights to the stadium parking lot, that should be some leverage to demand more cash for the city in the next lease, right? Leverage? You Anaheim city officials have heard of using leverage to make demands, right? It’s all the rage!

Friday roundup: New sports venues, new sports venue threats, and our dwindling journalistic resources

Deadspin’s Albert Burneko is a national treasure whether he’s writing about sports or movies or punctuation, and his takedown this week of a Fivethirtyeight article that asserts there are too many minor-league baseball teams is very much no exception. Drop whatever you’re doing — which is reading this post, so okay, drop whatever you were going to do after that — and read it now, whether you care about the purpose of sports as entertainment or the role of the media in management-labor relations or the increasing propensity to reduce human beings to measures of technocratic efficiency. With the demise of the alt-weeklies, there are fewer and fewer outlets eager to combine tenacious reporting and big-picture analysis and engaging writing toward the end of helping us understand the world we live in beyond “here are some potentially viral things that happened today,” so we need to cherish those that remain while we can.

And with that, here are some potentially viral (in the not especially infectious sense) things that happened this week:

Friday roundup: When is a football stadium too old to be a football stadium?

If it wasn’t clear from the photos of devastation in the Bahamas, the death toll from Hurricane Dorian is going to get much, much worse than the official confirmed number (30, at this writing). You can find a list of some organizations raising money to help survivors here; please give generously if you can. And remember as you do that it’s the warming oceans that helped make this so bad.

And with that, on to news that’s marginally less life and death:

  • Denver Metropolitan Football Stadium District chair Ray Baker says the Broncos‘ current stadium (which just got a new corporate name, go keep track of these things on your own if you like because I can’t be bothered to remember them) should last “between 50 and 60 years,” at which point Broncos president Joe Ellis replied that “I can’t judge where entertainment venues are going to need to be in the future” and “I can’t tell you whether or not, in 10 years, the city of Denver and our seven-county region has an appetite to host a Super Bowl or an appetite to host a Final Four, which means you need a roof. Or do you need a new stadium?” The new naming-rights deal lasts 21 years, at which point the stadium will be 40 years old; please place your bets on whether it will still be standing by then.
  • RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., will not make it to its 60th birthday in October 2021, which is all well and good as nobody plays there now and it’s costing the city $3.5 million a year for maintenance, landscaping, pest control, security, and utilities. (Note: Yeah, that seems like a lot to me too for an empty stadium.) D.C. officials say they plan to build an indoor sports complex and food market on the site, but have no plans as yet for an NFL stadium, no matter how much Mayor Muriel Bowser might want one.
  • Cleveland Browns COO David Jenkins says team execs still haven’t decided whether to demand a new stadium or a renovated one, but “we’re not far from having those conversations.” Note to Denver: The Browns’ stadium is two years older than the Broncos’.
  • Forbes reports that the value of the Oakland Raiders jumped by $1.5 billion to $2.9 billion after announcing their move to Las Vegas, which is an indication that either there’s something wrong with Forbes’ franchise valuation estimates or there’s something wrong with how much rich people are willing to spend to buy sports teams, or both. Even with the state of Nevada kicking in $750 million, the team will still be on the hook for more than $1 billion in stadium construction costs, which is going to soak up most of the team’s new stadium revenue even if their plan to sell tickets mostly to tourists and visiting fans works out.
  • The Anaheim city council is still squabbling over who knew when that when they voted on a Los Angeles Angels lease extension back in January, they were actually giving team owner Arte Moreno the right to stay through 2029 if he wanted, not just until 2020. (The team owner got a one-year extension of his opt-out clause as well, but the lease is now back in place to its original expiration date set before Moreno opted out the first time last year.) One thing that’s for sure is that this was a major gift to Moreno as stadium renovation talks continue, because “the best friend of a sports team owner is time,” says, uh, me.
  • A bill making it easier for Oakland to create tax districts at Howard Terminal to help raise money for infrastructure for a new A’s stadium passed the California state legislature this week; it’s still unclear exactly how much tax money would be spent on infrastructure, or exactly what “infrastructure” would mean, or even if the stadium will be built at Howard Terminal at all, but that’s one more skid greased, anyway.
  • The new Long Island Railroad station outside the new New York Islanders arena is set to be open by 2022, which only about 90 years faster than these things usually go in New York. It helps to have friends in high places!

 

Anaheim mayor hints at ways he could lowball Angels lease payments

The Anaheim city council met last night to discuss a new lease for the Los Angeles Angels that could include a sale of city development rights to team owner Arte Moreno to fund stadium renovations, but it’s 8:30 am on the West Coast already and nobody seems to be reporting on what happened, not even Twitter. Wake up and type already, Southern California!

In the meantime, though, the Voice of OC’s Spencer Custodio noted yesterday that an op-ed penned last Thursday by Mayor Harry Sidhu contained some clues about his thinking going into lease talks:

As part of the negotiating team, I will insist that any land sales or leases be at market prices, reflecting ongoing baseball use, development we’re likely to see and any requirements we may ask for with the land. You’ll hear some argue for unrealistic prices based on what we might see if we sold all of the land for housing.

That seems to imply that whatever valuation the city places on the land, it will be for its use for the hotel-and-retail development that’s actually planned, not the “highest and best use” test that would result if the whole site were turned over to housing. That’s not necessarily unreasonable — you want to value the land on what it’ll be used for — but it does mean any appraisal should be carefully judged for its methodology, particularly what comparables it uses to get a price per acre.

Sidhu also wrote:

If we see a new lease for a city-owned stadium, it should include annual rent payments, city revenue-sharing or a combination of both. You’ll hear a lot about rent at Angel Stadium. Unfortunately, much of it is misleading.

Those who don’t want the Angels to stay, or only want a deal on their terms, will tell you the team doesn’t pay rent at the stadium. From 1996 to 1998, the team paid $87 million to fix up Angel Stadium, which then was 30 years old.

That was $87 million our residents did not have to pay to fix up our stadium.

Under the team’s current lease, $80 million of that investment counted as prepaid rent, working out to $2.5 million a year for the 33-year life of the lease. But that’s history now.

That’s considerably less reasonable: The $87 million cost wasn’t for necessary repairs to Angel Stadium, it was for stuff the Angels (then owned by Disney) wanted, mostly the removal of the outfield grandstand that had been added for the Rams in the 1970s and its replacement by some bleachers and landscaping. Counting it as “prepaid rent” assumes that these were somehow public expenses for a public benefit that the team was reimbursing the city for, which is only true if Anaheim residents were clamoring for a giant fake pile of rocks.

Anyway, this is all very much the pregame: We’re not going to know what Sidhu has in mind until he lays his cards on the table, first and foremost that land appraisal. One can only hope that it will be revealed sooner than the day of a vote on the new lease, since that seems to be the way some governments operate these days. One councilmember has requested a minimum 30-day comment period, but Sidhu and the rest of the council weren’t having it — “I will not put any timeline,” said Sidhu said, “whether it’s 30 days, 45 days, 10 days, 5 days ”— so be afraid, be very afraid.

UPDATE: Here’s Custodio’s report on the Anaheim council hearing, and it doesn’t look like much of import happened, beyond agreeing that there should be “no public subsidy or giveaway of tax dollars,” which, nobody ever admits that their plan is a “giveaway.” The land appraisal is still being called a “draft” and has no set release date, and several councilmembers said they were against making public any of the proposals before a vote, with Councilmember Lucille Kring saying, “negotiations are done in secret for a reason.” Uhhh, so no one can find out about them and object to them before you vote for them and it’s too late? It’s that one, right?

Anaheim plans public forums on sale of stadium land to Angels, but won’t tell public how much it’s worth

The city of Anaheim finally got back its long-awaited appraisal of the Los Angeles Angels stadium parking lots that Angels owner Arte Moreno wants to develop to fund upgrades to the stadium, and is ready to open negotiations on a new lease. And that appraisal says:

The appraisal, which city officials say is an incomplete draft, has not been made public.

Say what? The city spent nine months getting the property appraised, now has in hand a report that’s good enough to start talks with the team on a development deal, but it’s not good enough to share with anyone outside the negotiating room? Are they still waiting for the soundtrack to be added?

This is, let us say, a disturbing trend. You’ll recall that the state of New York similarly negotiated a land lease to the New York Islanders as part of a development project to fund a sports venue while keeping its land value appraisals secret, only releasing them hours before the final state board vote and even then releasing only summaries that didn’t show how the appraisal figures were arrived at. As things like sweetheart land deals increasingly subsidize sports projects — since handing over piles of cash is increasingly unpopular with the public — it’s vital to know whether a city is getting fair market value or gift-wrapping development rights for a team owner, and it’s hard to do that when the government’s own assessment is kept secret.

Anaheim councilmember Jose Moreno has announced two community forums on August 21 and 29 to answer questions about the Angels’ lease renewal plan; it’s going to be interesting to see how he ducks all the inevitable questions about “So how much is this land worth that you want to give to Moreno, and how much will he be paying us?” (Assuming that the appraisal is still secret by then, that is. We can always hope!)

In related news, it turns out that when Anaheim extended the Angels’ existing lease through the end of 2019 last year, it actually extended it through 2029, while giving Moreno a new opt-out through the end of 2019. This is even stupider than the lease extension sounded at the time — hey, everybody, now that the team owner has opted out of his lease, let’s give him another year to try to extort money from us, but give ourselves no leverage because if it doesn’t work he can just stay put for a decade under the terms of his existing lease where he pays no rent — especially since Anaheim councilmembers apparently didn’t understand that that was what they were voting on at the time.

Anaheim still has some leverage here: Moreno’s only current alternative stadium option is a plan in Long Beach that no one knows how to pay for and is on too small a site to fit a major-league stadium, so if he opts out again this December, he once again will risk making his team homeless. Though if the city plans to keep responding to Moreno’s “send money or I’ll shoot my team” threats by giving him another year of rope, the threats could literally go on forever. I’m starting to think that the Anaheim council could really use some lessons in haggling.

Friday roundup: Indiana and Missouri rack up another $390m in team subsidies, and other dog-bites-man news

Sadly, there’s another loss to report this week: Rob McQuown, who for the past decade has been one of the core tech and admin guys at Baseball Prospectus, passed away on Tuesday. I never met Rob personally, but in my days writing and editing for BP we exchanged emails a ton, and he was always a sharp and good-humored presence keeping the site running behind the scenes. (He wrote some excellent fantasy baseball coverage for a while, too.) I haven’t heard the details of his death, but I do know it was way too soon, and my sympathies go out to all his friends and family and colleagues who are mourning him this week. Here’s a lovely podcast tribute by Ben Lindbergh to Rob’s multifarious and too-often underappreciated gifts.

And now, to the news:

  • The Indianapolis City-County Council gave final signoff to $290 million in subsidies for the Indiana Pacers, which along with new and past operating subsidies brings team owner Herb Simon’s total haul to more than a billion dollars. The team’s new lease lasts until 2044, but I’d wager that Simon won’t wait that long before going back to what’s been an insanely lucrative taxpayer well.
  • The state of Missouri has reportedly approved $3 million a year for 20 years, coming to a total of $70 million, for upgrades for the St. Louis Blues, Kansas City Royals, and Kansas City Chiefs stadiums — yeah, I don’t get how that math works either, especially when this was previously reported as $70 million for the Blues plus $30 million for the K.C. teams, and has elsewhere been reported as $70 million for the Blues and $60 million for the K.C. teams, but I’m sure it was copied from a press release somewhere, and that’s what passes for fact-checking these days, right? This brings the teams’ total haul to … let’s see, the K.C. teams got $250 million previously, and the Blues owners got $67 million in city money, so let’s go with “around $400 million,” about which you can say that it’s at least cheaper than what Indiana taxpayers are on the hook for, and that is pretty much all you can say.
  • The city of Anaheim is still waiting on its now-overdue appraisal of the Los Angeles Angels‘ stadium land so it can open talks with team owner Arte Moreno on how much he should pay for development rights on the stadium parking lots. Mayor Harry Sidhu has appointed a negotiating team, though, which includes Sidhu himself, something that has drawn criticism since Angels execs donated to his election campaign. Sidhu also stated that “our theme parks, sports venues and convention center are a matter of pride, but their real purpose is to serve residents by generating revenue for public safety, parks, libraries and community centers and by helping us keep taxes and fees low,” which is not likely to help convince anyone that he understands sports economics like his predecessor did and isn’t just repeating what his funders tell him.
  • Oak View Group’s Tim Leiweke is trying to build a 10,000-seat arena in Palm Springs, and economists point out that this won’t help the local economy much because “you’re crazy if you think I’m flying to Palm Springs to see your minor league hockey team,” and Leiweke says Palm Springs is just different, okay, because so many attendees will be people who are already coming to town to play golf, gamble, or stay at local resorts. How this makes it a major economic plus when those people also see a concert when they’re in town Leiweke didn’t say, but who’re you going to believe, a bunch of people who study economics for a living or a guy who was once the youngest GM in indoor soccer?
  • A Cincinnati nonprofit is trying to raise $2 million to preserve affordable housing around F.C. Cincinnati‘s new stadium, and the Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority says that maybe building more market-rate housing will allow low-income residents of existing buildings to stay put. Yeah, that’s really not going to work.
  • Nobody in Miami-Dade County has studied the impact of building a new Inter Miami stadium right next to the city’s airport, and some county commissioners think that maybe that might be a thing they’d want to study.
  • Here’s a good, long R.J. Anderson article on three cities vying for MLB expansion teams (Portland, Montreal, and Raleigh) that should provide reading material for the inevitable endless wait for MLB to actually expand. (I’m also quoted in it, right before Jim Bouton.)
  • And here’s another long article that quotes me, this one by Bill Shea of The Athletic on how stadium subsidies have changed since the Great Recession (some sports economists say it’s tougher to get public money now, I say “Bah!”).

Friday roundup: Red Wings owner touts his “passion” amid sea of parking lots, cities are terrible stadium negotiators, newspapers are terrible newspapers

The cryptocurrency-based journalism startup Civil couldn’t have gone much worse, but it did spawn a couple of successes, none more welcome than Hmm Daily, the news commentary site from former Gawker and Deadspin editor Tom Scocca. Or as I will always think of him, the co-founder of Funny Paper, the now virtually unfindable-on-the-internet weekly(ish) political analysis of daily comic strips that was the greatest such enterprise until the great Josh Fruhlinger elevated it to an even higher art form. I’ve been enjoying Scocca’s excellent columns on the militarization of language and how big a giant bee is for months now, but I didn’t feel compelled to bite the bullet and kick in any money until I spotted this photo caption in an article by Scocca’s Funny Paper co-conspirator Joe MacLeod: “I have no beef with the M&M’s homunculus infesting the menu.” If you know me at all from reading this website, you know that I immediately pulled out my wallet and became a paying Hmm Daily subscriber (at the $5 a month level, though the reward at the $50,000 level is truly amazing).

Anyways, on to the sports stadium and arena newses:

  • The District Detroit development around the new Red Wings arena still consists mostly of some state-subsidized parking lots, but Red Wings exec Christopher Ilitch says that’s okay because “Our timelines may change. Our passion, the energy, the way we feel about this community has not.” And truly, who can put a price on feels?
  • The Voice of OC cites “experts” as saying that Anaheim may not be driving a hard enough bargain with Los Angeles Angels owner Arte Moreno on a price for stadium parking lot development rights, and oh hey look, it’s me. Also Holy Cross economist Victor Matheson, who says, “Cities tend to be remarkably bad negotiators when it comes to professional sports,” which, yup.
  • Politifact Wisconsin did a fact-check on claims that the state of Wisconsin will get a “tremendous” payback on its Milwaukee Bucks arena subsidies and found that that’s only if you assume the Bucks would have moved without them, and assume that Bucks fans would have all stopped spending their money in Wisconsin without them, and assume that NBA salaries will quintuple by the 2040s, and further found that Villanova sports stadium researcher Rick Eckstein calls the revenue estimates “fantasy figures,” and concluded that this makes the claim Mostly True. It is just slightly possible that having staff members of the local newspaper that has a record of overarching credulity on the arena deal do fact-checking on it might not be the best idea.
  • The people trying to get an MLB franchise in Portland are running out of momentum as MLB waits for the Tampa Bay Rays and Oakland A’s to work out their stadium situations before considering expansion, but at least they got a meeting with MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred — no wait, the news report has corrected itself, they didn’t even get that. Well, at least they have weirdly non-Euclidean renderings.
  • Speaking of MLB expansion hopefuls, Montreal’s would-be neo-Expos owner Stephen Bronfman has a deal in place on land for a new stadium … not on buying the land, mind you, but with a developer to help develop the non-stadium part of the land once they buy it. This could be a while.
  • And speaking of the Rays and of terrible newspapers, the Tampa Bay Times’ John Romano wants to know when St. Petersburg and Tampa officials will stop bickering and get to work on throwing money at Rays owner Stuart Sternberg already?
  • The New York Times is a significantly less terrible newspaper, but a profile on A’s president Dave Kaval with the headline “Can This Man Keep the A’s in Oakland?” is not only pretty sycophantic in its own right, but it assumes a lot about the team owners moving without a new stadium when they’ve already gone a couple of decades demanding a new stadium and not getting one and still not moving.
  • Henderson, Nevada, is giving $10 million to the owners of the Vegas Golden Knights to build a practice rink, which is dumb but less dumb than some other cities’ expenses on similar projects.
  • The Arizona Coyotes are getting a new majority owner and the Phoenix Suns are up for sale, according to Sportsnet’s John Shannon, who added, “as one NHL official told me yesterday, when I asked that very question, I said, ‘Does this new owner mean that there’s an arena closer to fruition?’ And the answer was, if you get a new owner, there’s a better chance of a new arena. So you can put two and two together, Steve.” Then the Suns owners and a report in The Athletic on the Coyotes completely refuted what Shannon said, so maybe you’re better off putting two and two together without his help.
  • I was about to write up this news story about a potential rezoning approval for Austin F.C.‘s new stadium, but then I saw that KXAN managed to write “Austin’s Planing Commission” and “this ammendment” in the first three paragraphs, and now I gotta go cry all day about the death of copy editing, sorry.