Islanders and NYCFC shed no light whatever on their Belmont bids

There was a public “listening session” yesterday on plans for redeveloping land alongside Belmont Park, and both the New York Islanders and NYC F.C. made presentations, and “details” were “revealed,” according to the New York Post headline, and oh boy oh boy let’s see what we’ve got:

Reps for the NYCFC soccer organization, which currently plays at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, say the team’s plans for a 26,000-seat stadium at the Elmont, LI, site would also include 400,000 square feet of retail and entertainment space, 15.3 acres of open space, a 5-acre park and 2-acre soccer facility…

The Islanders’ plan calling for an 18,000-seat arena was revealed to include an entertainment hub, hotel and retail village.

Wait, that’s it? We already knew pretty much all that — not down to the tenth of an acre, sure, but “sports facility accompanied by other development” was both teams’ plan all along. No details about how this would be funded? No renderings? Come on, we gotta at least get some renderings!

That’s not a rendering! There aren’t even any fireworks or lens flare! This Monday sucks.

(Here’s a video of the Islanders’ developer talking about how he used to build snowmen with Mets co-owner Jeff Wilpon when they were kids, which is something, I guess.)

Friday roundup: Battles over Blues arena, Vegas bond subsidy, Belmont land for Islanders

Let’s get right to this week’s remainders:

Friday roundup: Raiders talk lease extension, Rams attendance woes may set record, and more!

Here’s what you missed this week, or rather what I missed, or rather what I saw at the time but left till Friday because there are only so many hours in the week, man:

NYCFC, Islanders to go head-to-head for Belmont Park land as potential new home

Today is the deadline for responses to New York state’s Request For Proposals for redeveloping a plot of land near Belmont Park racetrack just outside the New York City border, and it looks like the Islanders are going to have some sports competition for their arena plans after all:

New York City FC, the pro soccer team partly owned by the Yankees, is preparing the submit a bid to build a soccer stadium on the state-run property in Elmont, Long Island, near the Queens border, sources told The Post Monday night…

NYCFC would partner with developer Related Co. in its proposal, sources said. … The Islanders bid is expected to include teaming up with Sterling Project Development, which is controlled by the majority owners of the Mets; and Oak View Group, which is backed by Madison Square Garden, owners of the NHL’s Rangers and National Basketball Association’s Knicks.

The state Empire State Development Corporation told me it won’t be releasing the RFP responses, so we’re going to have to depend on whatever the Islanders and NYC F.C. tell us about their plans, which isn’t likely to be much. (Though I do eagerly anticipate some wacky renderings with lots of fireworks going off.) The prospect of two sports franchises going at it for the same land at least raises the possibility of a Seattle-style bidding war here, which could only be good for New York state taxpayers. More news, and pretty pictures, tomorrow, I hope.

NYCFC are terrible at home, terrible home to blame

As many of you are probably aware, I’m a strong proponent of finding ways to get use out of existing sports venues instead of spending hundreds of millions of dollars to build new ones, mostly because they’re almost never worth it and so somebody (i.e., Mr. and Mrs. Q. Taxpayer) usually ends up having to foot the bill. I’m willing to admit, though, that NYCFC squeezing an MLS field into a baseball stadium may not have been the best idea of all time:

Unlike the NFL, where every field conforms to precise dimensions, a soccer pitch can vary within FIFA (and in this case, MLS) regulations. In the case of Yankee Stadium, that means a smaller field, which robs teams of their space to create — and the Stadium offers the smallest playing surface in the league. For a finesse club like NYCFC, that is the equivalent of the Yankees sending out a lineup devoid of lefty power to take advantage of the short right-field porch…

And at 110 yards by an MLS-minimum 70 yards, or a Hobbit-sized 7,700 square yards, the small field makes NYCFC easier to press and close down. The next-smallest fields are 8,250 square yards and eight are at least 9,000 square yards.

While all this is sad if you’re an NYCFC supporter and fairly entertaining if you’re not — they lost a game last year when an opposing player practically threw the ball into the goal from the sideline, which is hilarious — it’s important to note that this is no one’s fault but NYCFC’s own: They chose to place a team in New York with nowhere to play but New Yankee Stadium, and then chose to sign a bunch of finesse players with famous names who would be at a huge disadvantage playing on a small pitch. Talks about a new stadium in upper Manhattan have gone approximately nowhere, and there’s really no reason for the city to put itself out to solve a problem of the team’s own making, so NYCFC will likely just need to suck it up and rebuild its roster to play in cramped surroundings for the foreseeable future. To do otherwise would be like the Colorado Rockies demanding a pressurized dome to make up for the fact that they unexpectedly found the air thin in Denver — oh, crap, I’m giving people ideas again, aren’t I?

Yankees order NYCFC to stop taking print-at-home tickets, fans locked out of stadium for home opener

I wrote up an article for Vice Sports on Friday on how several sports teams, including the New York Yankees and Minnesota Timberwolves, have banned the use of print-at-home tickets, ostensibly to prevent fraud and counterfeiting but really because it allows them to control the resale of tickets via their own phone apps. I didn’t cover it here because it’s not really so much about stadiums, but following yesterday’s fiasco at NYCFC‘s home opener, I can’t resist:

NYCFC, which plays at Yankee Stadium, announced Friday that the team would no longer accept paper tickets, but the policy would be phased in.

The change—shockingly—led to chaos at Sunday’s NYCFC game.

Apparently what happened is that NYCFC allowed the use of print-at-home tickets, but required that they be “verified” before fans could enter, whatever that means. (Isn’t verification what the scanners at the turnstiles do?) The result was that shortly before game time (it’s hard to tell whether this was taken eight minutes before game time or just posted then), the inside of the stadium looked like this:

With NYCFC half owned by the Yankees, I can’t wait to see how they to resolve this by suggesting that fans all get their fingerprints scanned.

UPDATE: We have our first eyewitness report, and it indicates that the problem yesterday may have been due more to incompetence than intent:

UPDATE #2: An NYCFC official says the problem wasn’t the print-at-home tickets, which were accepted at all gates, but an eight-minute malfunction with the turnstile scanners that backed up the queues at the peak of pregame entry. Still awaiting word back on what the “verification” process was that had tickets scanned once before fans went through security and once after.

NYCFC mulls tearing down Columbia football stadium, building most expensive MLS stadium ever

New York City F.C. has finally settled on a possible new stadium site, and it’s not way out in Queens, but actually in Manhattan. Barely:

New York City F. C., owned jointly by royalty from the United Arab Emirates and the Yankees, is considering a move to Columbia University’s Baker Athletics Complex, at the northern tip of Manhattan. … The proposal is to build a new, larger stadium that could be used by the soccer team and Columbia’s football team. …

The plan, according to an executive briefed by the soccer club, would be to demolish the 17,000-seat Robert K. Kraft Field at Lawrence A. Wien Stadium and replace it with a 25,000-seat stadium that could be used by New York City F.C. and Columbia’s Lions. The new stadium could cost $400 million.

There is much that is crazy-sounding here — for starters, the site is a long, long subway ride from anywhere other than upper Manhattan, and doesn’t offer much in the way of parking — but nothing more so than that $400 million figure, which would be more than $100 million more than the most expensive MLS stadium ever built. I know that the NYC F.C. owners desperately want to get a soccer-only facility within city limits, and the UAE has money to burn, and potentially Columbia could be involved monetarily here too … still, this seems like a nutso amount of cash to spend on a soccer stadium in the U.S., and something the team is unlikely to recoup.

That’s NYC F.C.’s owners’ problem, of course, unless they decide to ask for public subsidies and make it New York City taxpayers’ problem. (They wouldn’t owe property taxes, for one thing, since the land is already tax-exempt by virtue of being owned by Columbia — the Chrysler Building, oddly, gets a similar tax break.) There’s a lot still to be worked out here, but at least we have a likely location where this next battle is going to play out.

NYCFC fans disappointed by lack of turf-related pratfalls in opening match

NYC F.C. held their opening game yesterday, and nobody tripped and fell on the temporary sod that was laid down as a soccer pitch. So, success! Also, the team won and David Villa scored a real pretty goal, so a good time was had by all.

For our unintentional laughs, then, we’ll have to turn to MLSsoccer.com’s article on the “rich soccer history” of ersatz Yankee Stadium, which has included several European friendlies! Also, Pele played a bunch of times in the stadium that had the same name across the street! It’s practically a soccer mecca! If you overlook the fact that the tiny pitch they squeezed in is smaller than all but one in the Premier League, but hey, short porches are part of the Yankee tradition.

Two days before NYCFC opener, Yankee Stadium field is a dirt pile

And elsewhere in F’ed-Up Field Friday, the stadium that inherited the name Yankee Stadium from the real Yankee Stadium is set to host NYC F.C.‘s home opener in just two days, and yow:

That’s one bad-looking soccer pitch. Presumably they’re laying down sod as you read this (for once it’s not snowing in New York right now) — which they have to do in part anyway to cover the dirt infield — but playing sports on freshly laid sod doesn’t always work out so well. As with the Wrigley Field situation, conditions will no doubt be playable, but it’ll be interesting to see how well it works out.

And as for when the baseball season starts, at least one Yankees player is already preparing for the worst:

“It’s going to suck,” Teixeira told the Daily News, “but you have to deal with it. It’s going to tear up the infield, but there’s nothing we can do about it, so we’ll deal with it.”

But then, Teixeira already has years of experience with unavoidable situations that destroy his infield.

Could NYCFC build a stadium at Broadway Junction? Is this headline starting an unfounded rumor? Yes!

This was buried deep in an article in Saturday’s New York Daily News, so thanks to Dave Martinez of Empire of Soccer for spotting it: One of the board members of New York City F.C. says the team’s search for a stadium site is now focused on Queens or Brooklyn:

“We had focused on the Bronx, but that didn’t work out, and we weren’t able to find anything else in the Bronx that made sense,” [New York property attorney Martin] Edelman says. “So we’re looking in Queens and Brooklyn, and each potential [site] has to be analyzed for construction, for access to public transportation, for parking, it’s a very complicated process.

“There’s no rush, but there’s a rush. In other words we’re not going to just settle for something, we’re going to find a place where everybody is comfortable doing it, and it makes economic sense to do it. But we’re not just sitting and waiting for the place to come to us.”

That’s a really long-winded way of saying “we don’t know yet,” obviously. The only potentially interesting tidbit is the mention of Brooklyn, which hasn’t previously been discussed as a possible stadium site for NYC F.C., largely because there are no large available unused sites near public transit in Brooklyn where you could easily stick a soccer stadium. (I know because we went through this ten years ago with proposed alternative locations for the Brooklyn Nets arena, and there wasn’t much there.) The one possible wild card could be the Broadway Junction train hub, which Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration has targeted for redevelopment as a college campus, mall, or other large anchor project. It’s not clear that there’s room on the city’s site map for a soccer stadium, and you’d hope de Blasio knows that a building that’s dark 340 days a year is a lousy anchor for redevelopment, and yes, I’m completely speculating wildly here. But you come up with a more reasonable site in Brooklyn — unless you think that Edelman is just saying “Brooklyn” to try to get some buzz about the team going in Sweden, which is entirely possible.