Cavs arena subsidy demonstrators go to Detroit to demand of Gilbert: Can we get a cut, too?

Points for creativity to opponents of Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert’s $70 million in glass wall subsidy demands, who took buses to Detroit to stage a protest on a melting public ice rink outside Gilbert’s Quicken Loans offices:

“We’re not all in,” the crowd of more than 150 chanted…

Stacy Mathews of Cleveland said there’s no guarantee that the community would benefit from a public investment in the arena.

“I don’t have any personal feelings against Dan Gilbert,” she said. “I don’t know him personally, but I just hope with the movement and changes that he’s trying to make for his team that he would also do that for the city as well. Cleveland right now are going pretty good, but there are still areas in Cleveland that need to be addressed. There are still many poor areas … (and resources needed) in the schools and things of that nature.”

Look, here’s video!

<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/dcDsBl5OdzY” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

Those aren’t necessarily the snappiest soundbites — and definitely isn’t the snappiest chant — and appears to be a bit of a pivot from “this is a stupid subsidy” to “if Gilbert is going to get $70 million in free public money, either he or the city of Cleveland should throw some money at other local needs as well.” This all appears to be heading toward a battle over a community benefits agreement, and you know my feelings about those.

Meanwhile, the Cleveland city council has introduced legislation to approve the Gilbert arena subsidy, and is expected to cast a final vote by mid-April. There may be some haggling over the details, but it looks like the plan to give a billionaire $70 million for no coherent reason at all is likely to sail through without much difficulty — and without Gilbert even having to come up with his own chants.

Kings tripling what they charge Sacramento State for graduation ceremonies, thanks to new arena

It’s Friday, so let’s celebrate the end of a long week with a sad tale of how not to write an arena lease, courtesy of the Sacramento Bee:

The Sacramento Kings more than tripled the amount they will charge Sacramento State for commencement at the new Golden 1 Center compared to their old home, according to a document obtained by The Sacramento Bee.

Last spring, the university paid $59,842 to hold seven spring graduation ceremonies at Sleep Train Arena.

Sacramento State’s new contract with the Kings Arena Limited Partnership asks the university to pay a base fee of $50,000 plus “additional charges” not listed in the contract to have graduation at Golden 1 Center. University officials estimate those charges, which include traffic management, camera operators, lighting and stagehands will add another $140,595 to the bill – for a total cost of $190,595.

This is sad and bad for the state university campus, which will now be out an additional $130,000 that it could have used for, you know, school stuff. But hey, vagaries of the market and all, so what you gonna do, right?

Except that Sacramento’s deal with the Kings was that the city could use the new arena for nine “civic events” per year — and the Sacramento State graduation, which was previously held at the Kings’ old arena, wasn’t included. (It’s expected that all nine this year will be high school graduations.) So instead, one side effect of giving the Kings $255 million in city subsidies for their new arena is that the local university has to pay more for their graduation costs, because the venue is shinier now. It’s the kind of thing that the city could easily have remedied by demanding that Sacramento State get access to the arena in exchange for throwing public money at it, but Kevin Johnson had other things on his mind at the time.

Of course, another side effect is that the city of Sacramento is now out $255 million. You can spend the next three days determining which is the insult, and which the injury — happy weekend!

Virginia Beach okays $206m arena subsidy, pats self on back for getting a new mortgage banker

Looks like Virginia Beach will be getting its new taxpayer-subsidized arena after all, as the city council met in closed session on Tuesday, as it likes to do, to approve a new version of the financing plan that it had all but killed last fall:

The council met with City Attorney Mark Stiles in closed session Tuesday night, and he told members that the financing is in line with the deal that was approved in December 2015, according to a Facebook post from John Moss. The council agreed with Stiles’ assessment, which means it would not require a new vote.

“See you at the ground breaking this fall,” Moss wrote.

The arena funding plan is hideously complicated, you may recall, with kickbacks of property taxes, business license taxes, admissions taxes, arena meals taxes, construction sales taxes, the city’s share of arena sales taxes, plus the top 1% off of the city’s 8% hotel tax, plus cash for infrastructure and land costs. It all adds up to about $206 million worth of subsidies for a $220 million arena, which, um, yeah. The main concession the city seems to have negotiated since October is that JP Morgan will now be the lender on the stadium construction costs instead of a Chinese bank, which also, um, yeah. But let’s all applaud Virginia Beach city officials for saying no to developers, everybody!

Virginia Beach will now spend the next 30 years debating whether to pay to renovate their new arena to lure an NBA or NHL team, because nobody’s going to want to play in a building opened way back in 2017, sheesh, get real.

Cuyahoga moves $70m Cavs subsidy forward, because mumble mumble “maximize assets” something

Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert took another step closer to getting $70 million in arena renovation subsidies on Tuesday when a majority of the Cuyahoga County Council voted to move the funding bill out of committee. A full council vote is expected on March 28, and unless somebody unexpectedly gets cold feet, the $140 million bond issue — half of which will be repaid by Cavs rent payments, the other half by ticket taxes and hotel taxes that currently go to city and county coffers — should pass easily.

Let’s check out what some county council members had to say!

“I do not think the deal is perfect but I do think the Quicken Loans Arena is by far the most important of Cuyahoga County’s entertainment and sports facilities. It is a vital and essential part of our economy.” —Dan Miller

“This is our facility and we will take care of it.” —Michael Gallagher

“This deal is not either/or or now or never but how and when.” —Shontel Brown

Well, at least nobody cited any dumb reasons like fear that the Cavs would move without a new glass wall or that arenas create scads of jobs or anyth—

“There is a threat the Cavs might leave and it is my job to have some stability. We own this building and we need to make sure our asset is maximized.” —Sunny Simon

“We need to maintain an economic driver that will not only keep my residents employed.” —Anthony Hairston

The Greater Cleveland Congregations group, which has opposed the deal and called for Gilbert to at least put money into a community development fund in exchange, was roundly ignored by the county council. The big wild card now is the Cleveland city council, which also has to sign off on the deal, and hasn’t even scheduled hearings — as Cavaliers CEO Len Komoroski noted, the team wants to start construction this summer to be ready for hosting an All-Star Game in 2020 (other cities like Houston and Orlando are bidding for it as well, but you’ve got to be prepared, right?), so they’re going to be pushing hard for an early decision. Here’s hoping the city council at least comes up with some better cliches before casting their votes.

Clippers mulling new Inglewood arena, this likely ends with Google owning all of sports, right?

And speaking of data points for an arena arms race, now Los Angeles Clippers owner Steve Ballmer is reportedly interested in building a new arena adjacent to the Los Angeles Rams‘ new Inglewood stadium, because they want their own L.A. Live or something:

Representatives of Steve Ballmer and Stan Kroenke, two of the richest owners in professional sports, have had multiple discussions about the Clippers joining the Rams and Chargers in the sports and entertainment district Kroenke is building in Inglewood…

“It’s too soon to say it would be L.A. Live lite, but if an arena were to bring 200 nights a year, that’s a tremendous amount of foot traffic that would benefit all the ancillary properties,” said a person familiar with the discussions who asked not to be identified in order to speak frankly about the situation.

To reiterate what I just wrote about a fifth arena in the New York City metro area: Building more arenas in an already well-served arena market doesn’t really make much sense, since you’re just squabbling over how to divide up the existing pie. (An L.A. Live Lite is only likely to get customers by drawing them off from the original L.A. Live district by the Staples Center, or maybe from other entertainment options elsewhere in the L.A. area.) And Ballmer making eyes at Inglewood could still very easily be a leverage tactic toward when his Staples lease is up for renewal in 2024. But then, this is after all how capitalism is supposed to work: Investors are so desperate to grab a slice of the market that they throw around whatever money it takes to enter the game, which ends up driving down windfall profits for everyone and benefiting consumers. It seldom works that way, sure, but it still can, on occasion, when corporations are more interested in fighting over the spoils than in colluding.

If there’s one thing that watching American capitalism has taught me, it’s that the likely outcome here is for one side to buy the other — Philip Anschutz couldn’t literally buy the Clippers since he already owns the Lakers, but some kind of Anschutz-Ballmer-Kroenke sports management consortium isn’t impossible, if you could get everyone’s egos out of the way. Now there’s a thought: The only thing stopping us from entering a complete monopolistic hellscape, now that the federal government has all but declared corporate consolidation a national priority, is the inability of the super-rich to get along. Strange days, indeed.

AZ legislators not actually all that stoked about approving $1b-plus in sports subsidies

So it turns out that giving Arizona Coyotes owner Anthony LeBlanc $170 million in state tax breaks to move from one part of the Phoenix area to another and also approving as much as $375 million in tax breaks for any other pro sports team that wanted a new stadium isn’t so popular in the Arizona state legislature after all. Or at least, isn’t quite popular enough to get a majority, probably:

A plan that would provide $225 million in public financing for a new $395 million Arizona Coyotes arena likely does not have the votes to pass the state Senate, key lawmakers told The Arizona Republic/azcentral Thursday.

Sens. Debbie Lesko, R-Peoria, and John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, said they definitely were going to vote against the plan, while Minority Leader Katie Hobbs, D-Phoenix, said there is little support among the chamber’s 13 Democrats. Meanwhile, Senate President Steve Yarbrough, R-Chandler, said he had “serious reservations” about the plan that would allow the National Hockey League team to build an arena in downtown Phoenix or the East Valley.

The utter stupidity of such a plan aside, this points up the political difficulty of getting state support for the subsidy deal: In addition to it becoming a partisan political issue (the sponsor of the bill is a member of the state’s Republican majority), there are regional splits as well, with West Valley legislators of both parties opposing a bill that would likely be used to subsidize a move of the Coyotes out of Glendale, which is in the West Valley. (Peoria is adjacent to Glendale, though Fountain Hills is in the East Valley.) Add in any legislators who are just opposed on the principle that throwing over a billion dollars at your state’s sports teams for no damn reason is a terrible idea — hey, it’s always possible — and the bill is “on life support,” according to the Arizona Republic.

Not that it won’t eventually happen, in some form. (You know how politicians love to haggle.) But it looks like it’s going to take a few more strands of spaghetti thrown at the wall before one of them sticks.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Give Cavs owner $70m, because LeBron and Mickey Mouse WOOHOO!!!

The Cleveland Plain Dealer has historically not been a very good newspaper in covering stadium development issues, taking local sports team demands seriously even when they want to do things like cover their stadium with a geodesic dome, and generally giving Roldo Bartimole an entire career of shaking his head sadly at their miserable reportage.

None of that, though, prepared anyone for this editorial published on Friday, which argues that it’s totally worth Cuyahoga County giving Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert $70 million to pay half the costs of an arena expansion because, well, let’s try to follow along:

[Do you remember] the payoff when LeBron James electrified the city and team by coming back and helping to deliver an NBA championship in a never-to-be-forgotten, come-from-behind series? A series that turned downtown Cleveland into a sea of ecstatic fans and led to a victory parade that attracted Cavs fans the world over for a glorious day of downtown pedestrian gridlock that banished our comeback doubts.

Yes, winning championships is fun. Gilbert doesn’t get to rescind that championship if his renovation isn’t approved. So, what’s your point again?

How much would it be worth to get even more economic development value from the money the public already has invested in Quicken Loans Arena — the jobs, the energy, the draw — by extending the life of the Q another dozen years or more?

An excellent question, though posed a bit strangely — the only thing threatening “the life of the Q” is the city and county’s eventual willingness to replace it, so it’s not like that decision is really hanging on a new glass exterior wall. But sure, it’s a calculation that should be conducted, ideally with studies and tax revenue projections and—

It’s certainly worth the deal on the table now in which the Cavs pay half and make other commitments to the county, city and region.

Or you could just say “You betcha!!!” Yup, that is also an option.

As part of the deal, the Cavs pony up $122 million of their own dollars (for an arena the public owns) and underwrite risk in the financing deal for the county and agree to stay in Cleveland until at least 2034.

Yeah, no, not exactly. That $122 million isn’t in cash but in increased future rent payments, which will reimburse the county for half the $140 million in renovation costs, leaving the other $70 million to be covered by ticket taxes and hotel taxes that would otherwise go into city and county coffers. Yes, the public owns the arena, but only on paper so Gilbert doesn’t have to pay property taxes. (He owns the revenue streams from the arena, which are the important part.) I have no idea what “underwrite risk” means, other than that Gilbert would over cost overruns, which, that’s all well and good, but he’d still get his $70 million in free money regardless.

The only real reason worth considering here is getting Gilbert to extend the Cavs lease to 2034, when it currently expires in … 2027. So that’s seven years of added lease time, in exchange for $70 million in renovation subsidies. We have seen worse deals, but that doesn’t necessarily make this a good one.

The Q is a city treasure that goes far beyond its use by the basketball team.

How many of the region’s children have been wowed there by Mickey Mouse on ice skates, circuses and monster truck shows? How many people have danced in the aisles to the performances of Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, Jay Z, Taylor Swift, Justin Timberlake, Beyonce? We want those acts to keep coming.

Now we’re getting deep into crazy talk, and not just because Paul McCartney is going to be 92 years old in 2034. Does the PD editorial board really think that Mickey Mouse is going to refuse to lace up his skates and play Cleveland if the arena doesn’t have a new glass wall in front? Have they bothered to investigate what concert acts want out of an arena? Or is investigation one of those old-media things that fly in the face of synergy and monetization and whatever else the things that used to be called newspapers are in the business of now?

All in all, this editorial can be summed up as: Arenas are fun places, is $70 million really too much to spend on more fun? To which the answer should be: We dunno, let’s check it out. That’s what the Detroit Free Press did when Gilbert came asking for cash for an MLS stadium in that city; clearly either the billionaire has greater pull in Cleveland, or the Plain Dealer editors have forgotten Rule #1 of journalism.

Arizona senators push to give Coyotes, Suns, D-Backs up to $1.1b for new arenas and stadium

Arizona Coyotes owner Anthony LeBlanc may not have any idea where he wants to build a new hockey arena now that Arizona State University pulled out of a planned venue in Tempe, but that’s not going to stop members of the Arizona state senate from pushing legislation to give him $170 million in sales- and hotel-tax kickbacks to help build one. And hey, while we’re at it, let’s make it easier for the Diamondbacks and Phoenix Suns to get state subsidies, too:

The bill would allow creation of “community engagement” districts of up to 30 acres. Within them, up to half of the state’s share of sales taxes generated from retail sales and hotel stays would be dedicated to paying the bond debt for new sports or entertainment facilities. It also would allow an additional 2 percent district sales tax to be applied to all purchases within the district, with those revenues also dedicated to defraying the cost of facility construction.

In the case of the Coyotes, the plan envisions public funding covering 57 percent of a new arena’s cost, with new sales taxes covering $170 million and the host city contributing $55 million. The Coyotes said the team’s portion would be $170 million, amounting to a 43 percent contribution toward the $395 million total cost.

This is a bit of a hybrid bill, combining super-TIFs (where half of existing sales and hotel taxes would be kicked back to pay teams’ construction costs) with a new sales tax surcharge in the area around the new sports venue. The math on how much of a subsidy this amounts to gets dicey — virtually all of a TIF would be cannibalized from sales and hotel tax receipts elsewhere in the state, but a slice of a sales tax surcharge could come out of a team owner’s pockets, depending on how big the surcharge area is — but the vast majority of it would be a straight-up gift to team owners, all to allow cities in one part of Arizona to steal teams from cities in another.

You’ll note that I said “teams,” not just the Coyotes. That’s because the new super-TIF districts could be applied to help build any new sports and entertainment facilities. The only limit is that state money would only be allowed to pay for half of construction costs up to $750 million — meaning that if the Coyotes, Suns, and Diamondbacks all availed themselves of the legislation, as you know they would love to do, Arizona taxpayers could potentially be on the hook for $1.125 billion. (If the Coyotes stick to their $170 million demand, the max would be only $920 million, but as we’ve seen before, sports construction costs only tend to go up, and there’s nothing stopping LeBlanc from revising his ask as time goes on.)

Now, the bill has so far only passed one committee in one branch of the Arizona legislature — Sen. Bob Worsley of Mesa used one of those “gut an unrelated bill and insert your own language” tricks to get it on the agenda of his own transportation and technology committee — and none of the teams involved have identified places where they’d like to build new facilities, or how to pay for their halves. Still, it’s a pretty remarkable response to a “crisis” started by the Coyotes’ need to leave their nearly-new arena in Glendale because … hey, Coyotes ownership, why do you need to leave again?

“It does not work in Glendale,” Ahron Cohen,the team’s general counsel, told the Senate panel. “In 2013, our ownership group bought the team. The previous ownership chose to go out there.”

Oh. Well, if it “doesn’t work,” then it doesn’t work. I thought you were going to say something about how you couldn’t bear to be forced to compete for the rights to operate the arena instead of just being handed $8 million a year by Glendale in a no-bid contract. Good thing it’s not that, because asking the state of Arizona to pay you a couple hundred mil to get you out of that pickle would be chutzpah in the Nth degree, and only complete morons in state government would actually consider it.

Milwaukee Bucks introduce “digital tour” of their PR spin for new arena

The Milwaukee Bucks have introduced an interactive virtual tour that fans can take of the team’s new $500 million arena that taxpayers are funding virtually all of , and — hey, wait a minute, that’s not an interactive virtual tour, that’s a video of some Bucks guy taking an interactive virtual tour! We want to do our own clicking on our own touchscreens, Bucks guy!

Anyway, for those who can’t be bothered to take 2:33 to watch the video, here are the highlights:

  • The virtual tour is “used in all of our meetings” and “super-impactful”!
  • There will be a lobby!
  • Fans sitting in the first four rows will get their own VIP entrance, so they aren’t forced to hobnob with those peons sitting in the fifth row!
  • Those VIP fans will get to gawk at/reach out and touch/throw things at the players as they enter the court via their tunnel from the locker room, because that’s worked oh so well in the past.
  • Designer types call entry ramps “vomitories” without thinking its funny, and apparently without thinking everyone else will think it’s funny.
  • Seventy-five percent of the main concourse is open to the court area, so that you can “grab a beer” and “still watch the action.” Now, having spent a lot of time at baseball games where open concourses are more common, I can tell you how this will work: Because of sports geometry, while you are waiting on line for your beer, you will only be able to see the airspace above the actual game; because of sports fan behavior, you won’t be able to see much of it, because lots of people will be standing at the edge of the concourse, blocking your view. So in reality, you will be waiting to grab your beer, will hear a big noise, look over to see what happened, not be able to see a damn thing, try to decide whether to run back to the seating bowl (or the vomitory) to see what’s going on, decide it’s too late, then look up at the video screens placed by the beer line to watch that instead. I.e., exactly what you’d do in a space without an open concourse, but with the added feature of eliminating several rows of decent seats and replacing them with ones at the back of the upper level.
  • Bucks guy says of the concourse that “this is where most of the guests are going to spend their time,” so either he’s anticipating really slow beer lines or acknowledging that most people will be there to eat the food, not watch the Bucks.
  • “Everybody is much closer to the action.” There is no way that this is true, especially when you consider those gaps for the open concourses, but it is a thing that every arena and stadium developer says, so this guy is contractually required to, too.
  • Those creepy party spaces where fans won’t get to see the game but will get to be bathed in strange neon lights are now called the “sky mezzanine level,” and the Bucks are “really excited” for people to use them for weddings and corporate events and stuff other than watching Bucks games, because that would be a terrible idea.
  • And speaking of terrible ideas, the “corner sponsor towers” that likewise featured no way for most fans to see the game and possibly no railings appear to be gone, though it’s hard to tell without a virtual tour that I can actually control.

In short, it looks pretty much like every other new sports venue, with maybe a couple of unique elements that could be fun or could be awful, but now comes with a heaping helping of PR to help you understand why you’re having a better time, whether or not you actually are. If that’s not super-impactful, I don’t know what is.

Warriors break ground on privately funded SF arena, only travesty is the entertainment

The Golden State Warriors held their long, long-awaited groundbreaking on their new San Francisco arena this week, which presumably means they’re actually going to build this thing. The event was not without its awkward weirdness, though:

Oooookay. That’s got to be the worst of it, though, right?

Man.

Anyway, the Warriors arena is still being built with $1 billion in private funding, because ownership decided it could make more money by having an arena closer to its wealthier fan base (and to give San Francisco its first arena for hosting concerts and such), which while slightly icky if you consider the whole “San Francisco is for richies while less-richies have to go live in the East Bay” thing is at least the way that matters should work in a world without public subsidies to chase after. And at least East Bay residents can still get to games easily enough — which is good, because it meant at least the Warriors avoided the embarrassment of having a fan from their former city interrupt their welcome-to-their-new-city event, like some other relocating California teams I could name.